Independent Journal
of Burmese Scholarship

About the Organizers of the Journal Project

James Scott teaches political science and anthropology at Yale University. He is interested in the history and ecology of the Irrawaddy River, hill peoples, and the preservation of historical memory. He recently published The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia.

email: james.scott@yale.edu

Alicia Turner is Associate Professor of Humanities at York University in Toronto and the co-Editor of The Journal of Burma Studies. She is interested in the history of Buddhism in colonial Burma and the intersections of nationalism, colonialism, and religion. She recently published Saving Buddhism: The Impermanence of Colonial Religion

Email: turnera@yorku.ca

Tharaphi Than teaches Burmese and Censorship at Northern Illinois University. Her research covers a wide range of topics from cartoons to migration to and from Burma. She has recently published her first monograph, Women in Modern Burma, and is currently working on her second book on the history of print media in Burma.

Email: tthan@niu.edu

Michael W. Charney teaches history at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He is interested in the Cold War, Burmese intellectual history, and the history of technology. His publications include Powerful Learning and A History of Modern Burma.

Email: mc62@soas.ac.uk

Ardeth Maung Thawnghmung is Professor and Chair of Political Science Department, University of Massachusetts Lowell. She is the author of the “Other” Karen in Myanmar (Lexington books 2012), Beyond Armed Resistance (East West Center 2011), Karen Revolution in Burma (2008), and Behind the Teak Curtain: Authoritarianism, Agricultural Policies and Political Legitimacy in Rural Burma/Myanmar (2004). Ardeth has just completed a book manuscript, Everyday Economic Survival in Contemporary Myanmar, which is currently under review. Ardeth has received fellowships from Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad, the Australia National University, Asian Research Institute at the National University of Singapore, East West Center Washington DC, and Southeast Asian Institute Singapore. She is also a recipient of 2007 Outstanding Teacher of College of Arts and Humanities.

Email: ardeth.thawnghmung@gmail.com

Saw Tun is retired from teaching Burmese language at Northern Illinois University from 1989 through 2010. Prior to Northern Illinois, he taught at the universities of Mandalay and Yangon inside Burma and Universiti Sains Malaysia in Penang, Malaysia. He is interested in ancient Burmese literature.

Email: mgmingala@gmail.com

Tun Myint is Associate Professor of Political Science at Carleton College, Northfield, MN, USA. He is also an Affiliated Faculty member of the Vincent and Elinor Ostrom Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA. He is interested in social ecological systems of Burma with a particular focus on agriculture, forestry, land-use land-cover change, rivers, and livelihood activities in both rural and urban settings. His publications have appeared in Ecology & Society, Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies, Legal Issues in Burma Journal, Perspectives on Politics, and TRaNS – Trans-Regional and -National Studies Journal. He is the author of Governing International Rivers: Polycentric Politics in the Mekong and the Rhine. Tun Myint served as a member of the Technical Advisory Team of the Federal Constitution Drafting Coordinating Committee of the Union of Burma, and was a Research Fellow of Asia Policy Program, a joint program of the National Bureau of Research and Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars.

Email: tmyint@carleton.edu

Soe Myint Aung is an independent scholar. As a Program Manager of the New York-based Open Society Foundations (OSF), he manages the Burma grants portfolio from the Rangoon office and monitors policy and advocacy initiatives inside Burma. Before joining OSF in October 2013, he served as the Program Manager of the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI).  Between 2005 and 2012, Soe Myint Aung worked for the German Embassy in Yangon as an Information Officer (Politics, Press, Economics).  He was educated at the University of Yangon and at the Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris (SciencesPo.) where he received a Master's degree in political science in 2003. He is a founder of the Yangon School of Political Science and served on the school's board of directors from its inception in 2011 until August 2014.

Email: s.m.aung@gmail.com

Bo Bo Lansin is a history graduate student from SOAS, University of London, studying development of Burmese militant nationalism under the British, and its impact on modern state building and army politics. He is also a broadcaster in BBC Burmese Service, London, and has contributed articles in Burmese media since 1998. He is helping to develop a digital library in his hometown, Mandalay, for academics and researchers in Burma Studies.

Email: bobolansin@gmail.com

Min Zin is a PhD candidate in Travers Department of Political Science at University of California, Berkeley. He is a comparative political scientist who studies civil-military relations, democratization, contentious politics, ethnic conflicts, and civil war, with a focus on Burma and Southeast Asian countries. His recent research examines nature of religious conflict in Burma’s political transition. Min Zin’s writings appear in Journal of Democracy, Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs, Social Research: An International Quarterly (forthcoming), Contemporary Southeast Asia (forthcoming), Georgetown Journal of International Affair, and many edited books. He serves as country analyst of Burma for several research foundations, including Freedom House. Min Zin also writes for The Foreign Policy Magazine, The New York Times, and other media outlets.

Email: min_zin@berkeley.edu

More bios forthcoming

Updated 2017.02.03 18:43:21 (EST)